Fall 2017 Capstone Colloquium Series - The Digital Solidarity Trap: Social Movement Research, Online Activism, and Accessing the Other’s Others

Join us this Wednesday, 11th October, when  Dr. Theresa Hunt will talk to us about "The Digital Solidarity Trap: Social Movement Research, Online Activism, and Accessing the Other's Others". It is a discussion of fieldwork in transnational settings, and introduces some ethical and practical considerations when engaging with digital research methods. 

Theresa Hunt (PhD, Rutgers University) is a Lecturer in the Science, Technology and Society program at New Jersey Institute of Technology. As an instructor, Dr. Hunt has worked closely with women interested in STEM careers, and in particular has designed programs and pedagogy to increase the effectiveness of student success through living/learning communities and innovative peer mentoring programs. She has published research on young women’s activism around global educational access, and in 2015 was awarded a seed grant to launch a pilot study on underrepresented minority women’s experiences in STEM fields at NJIT and NJ’s polytechnic institutes. Dr. Hunt has worked on with NSF-funded research teams through ADVANCE (2006-2009) and Women Engineers in Advanced Academic Positions (2008) grants, and in 2016 was named a research fellow of Collaborative for Leadership, Education, and Assessment Research (CLEAR) at NJIT.

Dr. Hunt has published articles and book chapters on the globalization of youth movements, gender parity in post-secondary education, and women’s activism in state revolutions. Her work has appeared most recently in the international youth studies journal Young (2016), the edited collection Digital Sociologies (University of Chicago Press, 2017), and Women Rising: Resistance, Revolution, Reform in the Arab Spring and Beyond (forthcoming, NYU Press). 
Dr. Hunt will discuss her role as part of the CUNY-based digital sociologies working group, which included methodological considerations for conducting research on transnational activist networks through Information and Communications Technologies. Her talk, “The Digital Solidarity Trap: Social Movement Research, Online Activism, and Accessing the Other’s Others”, offers recommendations for researchers hoping to draw on digital networks to access otherwise remote and potentially underrepresented populations.

Speaker: Dr. Theresa Hunt
Title: The Digital Solidarity Trap: Social Movement Research, Online Activism, and Accessing the Other’s Others
Date: Wednesday, October 11th
Time: 11.00am - 12.30pm
Location: Dana Room, Dana Library (4th floor)

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